#TrevorProject

The Trevor Project Donated 100 Gay "Marlon Bundo" Books To Karen Pence's Workplace

The gay bunny book has come back again.

Earlier this week, news spread that Karen Pence, wife to US Vice President Mike Pence, teaches art at a school that bans LGBTQ students.

Now in response to that news, the Trevor Project has announced that it’s donating 100 copies of Last Week Tonight with John Oliver Presents A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo to the Immaculate Christian School.

Along with the large donation came a note saying:

“Please accept our gift of ‘A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo’ books, which you may include in your school’s library or classrooms, and share with your family and friends. Combined with school policy changes, we believe these books can help encourage acceptance of LGBTQ young people among your community, and they can be a great first step to providing a safe and inclusive environment for all students.”

The copies should arrive later this week, according to a Trevor Project spokesperson who spoke to the Washington Post.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Marlon Bundo (Pence) (@marlonbundo) on

Marlon Bruno is the pet rabbit belonging to the Pence family.

Charlotte Pence, daughter to Mike and Karen, originally penned a children’s book about Marlon Bundo. The book explores the life of a rabbit living in Washington D.C. and at Number One Observatory Circle (the official home of the Vice President).

Proceeds from the book were also given to charities such as Tracy’s Kids and A21, an art program for children and an organization that fights human trafficking.

Then to egg-on Mike Pence, late night show host John Oliver created a parody book along with writer Jill Twiss and illustrator Eg Keller. The book titled “A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo” featured the same bunny but this time with him getting married to a male bunny named Wesley. Proceeds from that book were then donated to the Trevor Project and AIDS United.

While the spoof was ultimately made to antagonize her father and make a joke of her original story, Charlotte Pence later complimented Oliver’s efforts. She especially noted how the two books about bunnies were helping several charities.

But that good faith and mature outlook was not shared by enemies of Pence as the book continues to be used as a tool to mock the family. Not only was the book donated in this most recent development, but Will And Grace creator Max Mutchnik did the same last March.

Mutchnik donated a gay Marlon Bundo book to every elementary school in Pence’s home state of Indiana.

With each donated book there included a letter saying, “I would like to donate this copy of A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo to your library. After hearing about the book, I brought it home and read it to my twin daughters. It's a poignant story about how love and community can rise above intolerance.”

While both of these donations acted as a poke at the Pence family and their open anti-gay hate, they also doubled as an opportunity to spread LGBTQ representation in places where such content is often banned or censored.

But will these schools receive these donations as such or just as the condescending joke found at the surface? We’ll see what happens with the latest delivery in short time.

One of Our Top 18 Stories of 2018: Gay 17-Year-Old Leaves Behind A Heartbreaking Suicide Note

In no special order, we're recapping Instinct Magazine's Top 18 stories of 2018.

This one struck us and our readers hard on May 7th of this year.


 

This past Saturday, in a lengthy Twitter thread, Peter Delacroix shared the story of a gay 17-year-old who had committed suicide as a result of bullying and ridicule.

Delacroix woke up to an email from a teen he referred to as “Max” that was clearly a suicide note. Max was one of a group of queer teenagers that Delacroix counsels as a Youth Pastor at his church.

He immediately rushed to Max’s house, but it was too late. Max had hanged himself, and although CPR was administered, paramedics were unable to save him.

Delacroix described young Max as having “the heart of a lion, the soul of a poet and the smile of an angel.”

Apparently a budding musician, Delacroix says the 17-year-old’s music could “bring you to tears.”

We have lost an amazing, talented young man, lost his voice amid the howling storm of hatred that finally proved too much even for him.

Max’s grandmother asked Delacroix to share Max’s suicide note with the world.

The pastor says he struggled at the request, but eventually shared via Twitter because “I cannot in good conscience silence his last words.”

Repeat - this is being shared by request from Max’s family.

Dear World

You are ugly and dirty and you make me feel ugly and dirty. I have heard all my life that I am a sinner even though I love God and I like to think God loves me too.

I’m sorry Jack that I didn’t kiss you that day. I’m sorry Pastor Pete but please don’t be sad. Mostly I’m sorry Gramma because I know you tried really hard to love me when no one else would. I’m sorry I let you all down. I’m sorry but I’m just tired of all the hate.

I’m tired and want to sleep forever but maybe I will wake up in Heaven and there will be no hate there and only love. No one will call me bad names or hit me or remind me of my accidental place here.

Everyday I watch the news and see the hate against people like me and I realize I have no future. This country I don’t recognize anymore hates me and makes laws to punish me just because I’m gay.

They hate me because I love too much and love too wrong. I learned that my kind of love is bad. I heard it enough to believe it a long time ago.

Everyday someone comes along that tells me that I am worthless and my love, how I love, who I love is an affront to God as if anyone truly knows God’s mind.

I love beautiful things and I cry when they are gone. There is no more beauty left in the world. It has been replaced with this alien thing called hate. Bad people killed all the beautiful things. This is not a world I want to live in.

This is my choice the only choice I was ever given and it is mine alone.

I love you but I won’t miss any of this and I don’t think in the end I will be missed much at all in a world that looks at me like I’m something dirty they found on the bottom of their shoe.

I’m sorry I was weak and that I loved too much.

Max

The pastor did have a final message for Max: “You are wrong about one thing: you *will* be missed, by the entire world, who has been robbed of your beauty.”

And Delacroix had this to say to parents of LGBTQ kids: "Parents, if you have a queer child, hug them and tell them you love them. Do this every day. Tell them they are beautiful and have worth, no matter what anyone else might tell them. Be their armor against hate."

Max’s grandmother has asked those moved by Max’s loss consider donating to The Trevor Project or to a local homeless shelter dedicated to LGBTQ kids.

If you or anyone you know is in emotional distress or having suicidal thoughts, please call The Trevor Project 1-866-488-7386 (thetrevorproject.org) or the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-8255 (suicidepreventionlifeline.org).

(h/t LGBTQ Nation)

Don't Let Anxiety Be the Only Thing You Receive During the Holidays

It’s the holidays and while for many it means spreading cheer and joy, for others it could be a time of loneliness and depression that just perpetuates the struggles we face as members of the LGBTQ+ community. It seems that during these times our relationships become more complicated which fills our stockings with a bunch of unwanted anxiety. For LGBTQ+ youth, this could be an especially daunting experience since they are just learning to navigate through the plight of the queer existence.

That is why during this time of year it is particularly important to practice self-care so that we may stay grounded and focus on the positive aspects of our lives.

The Trevor Project has put together a list of holiday self-care tips for LGBTQ+ youth (but that can be used by everyone!).

They remind us:

Self-care plans can look very different from one another — they’re just as diverse and unique as the people who use them! Before creating one, it is important to remember that whatever you are feeling is completely valid. You are not wrong for having your feelings, and you deserve to feel supported and loved for all that you are. Sometimes, though, we don’t get that love and support from the people who are supposed to love and support us. Self-care can be a way to love and support ourselves when we need it most.

The reality is that some LGBTQ young people will spend the holidays with family; and for others, the holidays are a reminder of the loss of and the rejection from their families. Homelessness, violence, and suicidal thoughts affect LGBTQ youth uniquely and profoundly, and the holidays can be particularly difficult while alone.

As you enter a holiday gathering, it is important to remember that our identities are not contingent upon our family’s ability to understand or validate them.

Practicing self-care can help calm you down and allows you to reclaim control during moments when you feel there is none.

Here are some tips:

  • Find a friend or other supportive person with whom you can talk about your feelings. If there is an opportunity, be a part of your own gathering with this chosen family. This can be before, instead of, or after family gatherings.
  • Know you are not alone. Find that support system and plan with them if you will be attending a holiday gathering where you feel alone. This could be in person or even someone who can text/call you throughout the event to make sure you’re okay.
  • Create an affirmation to repeat in your head if/when you are feeling anxious or upset.
  • Dress as yourself. Use this opportunity to be creative. Wear clothing or accessories that you feel the most comfortable in as a reaffirming testament to who you are. It helps you to know that you have dressed for yourself and during uncomfortable situations knowing you have on that necklace, cool pair of socks, undergarment, or your favorite cute t-shirt can help remind you that you are present and important.
  • If holiday gatherings are not your thing, it’s great to do something you love. Watch your favorite TV shows or movies, create art, write, read, take a relaxing bath, cook, exercise, or do something that makes you feel comforted. Indulge yourself! Celebrate yourself!

We all want to be safe and wish the best for everyone in the LGBTQ+ community. Don’t let the holidays be a roadblock on your path toward happiness. Self-care is essential, for everyone, and it is a powerful way to show ourselves the love we deserve.

The Trevor Project is available for you 24/7 if you need additional support at 1-866-488-7386. You can reach out to their caring and compassionate counselors through Lifeline, Chat, and Text programs where you can talk about anything you are going through.

Stay happy during the holidays!

h/t: The Trevor Project

Gay 17-Year-Old Leaves Behind A Heartbreaking Suicide Note

This past Saturday, in a lengthy Twitter thread, Peter Delacroix shared the story of a gay 17-year-old who had committed suicide as a result of bullying and ridicule.

Delacroix woke up to an email from a teen he referred to as “Max” that was clearly a suicide note. Max was one of a group of queer teenagers that Delacroix counsels as a Youth Pastor at his church.

He immediately rushed to Max’s house, but it was too late. Max had hanged himself, and although CPR was administered, paramedics were unable to save him.

Delacroix described young Max as having “the heart of a lion, the soul of a poet and the smile of an angel.”

Apparently a budding musician, Delacroix says the 17-year-old’s music could “bring you to tears.”

We have lost an amazing, talented young man, lost his voice amid the howling storm of hatred that finally proved too much even for him.

Max’s grandmother asked Delacroix to share Max’s suicide note with the world.

The pastor says he struggled at the request, but eventually shared via Twitter because “I cannot in good conscience silence his last words.”

Repeat - this is being shared by request from Max’s family.

Dear World

You are ugly and dirty and you make me feel ugly and dirty. I have heard all my life that I am a sinner even though I love God and I like to think God loves me too.

I’m sorry Jack that I didn’t kiss you that day. I’m sorry Pastor Pete but please don’t be sad. Mostly I’m sorry Gramma because I know you tried really hard to love me when no one else would. I’m sorry I let you all down. I’m sorry but I’m just tired of all the hate.

I’m tired and want to sleep forever but maybe I will wake up in Heaven and there will be no hate there and only love. No one will call me bad names or hit me or remind me of my accidental place here.

Everyday I watch the news and see the hate against people like me and I realize I have no future. This country I don’t recognize anymore hates me and makes laws to punish me just because I’m gay.

They hate me because I love too much and love too wrong. I learned that my kind of love is bad. I heard it enough to believe it a long time ago.

Everyday someone comes along that tells me that I am worthless and my love, how I love, who I love is an affront to God as if anyone truly knows God’s mind.

I love beautiful things and I cry when they are gone. There is no more beauty left in the world. It has been replaced with this alien thing called hate. Bad people killed all the beautiful things. This is not a world I want to live in.

This is my choice the only choice I was ever given and it is mine alone.

I love you but I won’t miss any of this and I don’t think in the end I will be missed much at all in a world that looks at me like I’m something dirty they found on the bottom of their shoe.

I’m sorry I was weak and that I loved too much.

Max

The pastor did have a final message for Max: “You are wrong about one thing: you *will* be missed, by the entire world, who has been robbed of your beauty.”

And Delacroix had this to say to parents of LGBTQ kids: "Parents, if you have a queer child, hug them and tell them you love them. Do this every day. Tell them they are beautiful and have worth, no matter what anyone else might tell them. Be their armor against hate."

Max’s grandmother has asked those moved by Max’s loss consider donating to The Trevor Project or to a local homeless shelter dedicated to LGBTQ kids.

If you or anyone you know is in emotional distress or having suicidal thoughts, please call The Trevor Project 1-866-488-7386 (thetrevorproject.org) or the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-8255 (suicidepreventionlifeline.org).

(h/t LGBTQ Nation)